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I'm 23, figuring out my life one day at a time. I like pretty things and cupcakes. Also boobs. Boobs are nice. And so are dinosaurs. Dinosaurs with boobs....not so much. They/their pronouns please, she/her is ok though.

#class

inflateablefilth:

thepeoplesrecord:



With a long history of being beaten down for thinking and acting upon thought, working class parents are more likely to emphasize the role of politeness and courtesy and being deferential to authority. The result: working-class pupils lose out because they are ‘too polite’.
August 22, 2012
Pupils from wealthier households have more natural confidence at school after being taught by mothers and fathers to engage with authority figures, it was claimed.


The study found that children with working-class parents were more polite and courteous in lessons but often shunned teachers and attempted to solve problems alone – hampering their long-term academic development.


It was feared that the differences in classroom behaviour by the two groups may have knock-on effects in later life as poorer children slip further behind richer classmates.


The disclosure – in research published in the United States – comes amid continuing concerns over link between social class and educational achievement.


One British study earlier this year found that the highest-performing pupils from disadvantaged families lagged around two-and-a-half years behind bright children brought up in wealthy homes by the age of 15.

Despite an extensive Labour drive to boost access to higher education, it also emerged that the richest schoolchildren were around six times more likely to go on to a top Russell Group universities than the poorest fifth.
Jessica Calarco, assistant professor of sociology at Indiana University, assessed the classroom behaviour of primary-age pupils as part of the latest research.
She said: “Even very shy middle-class children learned to feel comfortable approaching teachers with questions, and recognised the benefits of doing so.
“Working-class children instead worried about making teachers mad or angry if they asked for help at the wrong time or in the wrong way, and also felt that others would judge them as incompetent or not smart if they asked for help.
“These differences, in turn, seem to stem not from differences in how teachers responded to students – when working-class students did ask questions, teachers welcomed and readily addressed these requests – but from differences in the skills, strategies and orientations that children learn from their parents at home.”
The study was based on observations of a class of state school children aged nine to 11 over a two year period. Children were assessed twice a week and then interviewed with their parents over the summer holidays.
Research revealed that pushy parents from all kinds of social backgrounds attempted to teach their children how to behave at school and work hard.
But a clear class divide in their methods emerged.
Working class parents were more likely to emphasise the role of politeness and courtesy and being deferential to authority, it was revealed. They would also tackle assignments or projects but on their own without asking for help.
In contrast, middle class children were encouraged to raise their hand, ask questions and not be afraid to ask for help when needed.
These children are then more likely to be noticed by teachers who tend to reward such behavior, said the study. It meant that they became more outgoing as they get older, which could help as they get jobs or have to deal with authority in other ways, it emerged.
Source


This definitely applies to me. When I’m in jobs I tend to let myself get treated like crap because I’m worried what will happen if I stand up for myself.

inflateablefilth:

thepeoplesrecord:

With a long history of being beaten down for thinking and acting upon thought, working class parents are more likely to emphasize the role of politeness and courtesy and being deferential to authority. The result: working-class pupils lose out because they are ‘too polite’.

August 22, 2012

Pupils from wealthier households have more natural confidence at school after being taught by mothers and fathers to engage with authority figures, it was claimed.

The study found that children with working-class parents were more polite and courteous in lessons but often shunned teachers and attempted to solve problems alone – hampering their long-term academic development.

It was feared that the differences in classroom behaviour by the two groups may have knock-on effects in later life as poorer children slip further behind richer classmates.

The disclosure – in research published in the United States – comes amid continuing concerns over link between social class and educational achievement.

One British study earlier this year found that the highest-performing pupils from disadvantaged families lagged around two-and-a-half years behind bright children brought up in wealthy homes by the age of 15.

Despite an extensive Labour drive to boost access to higher education, it also emerged that the richest schoolchildren were around six times more likely to go on to a top Russell Group universities than the poorest fifth.

Jessica Calarco, assistant professor of sociology at Indiana University, assessed the classroom behaviour of primary-age pupils as part of the latest research.

She said: “Even very shy middle-class children learned to feel comfortable approaching teachers with questions, and recognised the benefits of doing so.

“Working-class children instead worried about making teachers mad or angry if they asked for help at the wrong time or in the wrong way, and also felt that others would judge them as incompetent or not smart if they asked for help.

“These differences, in turn, seem to stem not from differences in how teachers responded to students – when working-class students did ask questions, teachers welcomed and readily addressed these requests – but from differences in the skills, strategies and orientations that children learn from their parents at home.”

The study was based on observations of a class of state school children aged nine to 11 over a two year period. Children were assessed twice a week and then interviewed with their parents over the summer holidays.

Research revealed that pushy parents from all kinds of social backgrounds attempted to teach their children how to behave at school and work hard.

But a clear class divide in their methods emerged.

Working class parents were more likely to emphasise the role of politeness and courtesy and being deferential to authority, it was revealed. They would also tackle assignments or projects but on their own without asking for help.

In contrast, middle class children were encouraged to raise their hand, ask questions and not be afraid to ask for help when needed.

These children are then more likely to be noticed by teachers who tend to reward such behavior, said the study. It meant that they became more outgoing as they get older, which could help as they get jobs or have to deal with authority in other ways, it emerged.

Source

This definitely applies to me. When I’m in jobs I tend to let myself get treated like crap because I’m worried what will happen if I stand up for myself.

(via karnythia)

suzy-x:

Brooklyn women make their building theirs

The rent strike started two years ago when Sara Lopez woke up early one morning. No one sleeps much in these three buildings — in the winter there’s no heat, in the summer there’s no electricity, and all year there are rats and cockroaches scurrying in the walls — but that morning Lopez had slept even worse than usual, and she was mad.
“I thought and thought and decided that I needed to do something,” she said. “So I knocked on 51 doors because I got mad of so much injustice.”
At each door she and Trelles spread a clear message: Stop paying rent. It wasn’t an idea born out of an ideology regarding private property or capitalism or self-governance. Instead, Lopez — a retired public employee who says she still has faith in the power and intentions of the local government — was espousing a radicalism born from necessity and experience. She knew that tenants could run the buildings better than Petito, whom she called un payaso, which means “clown” in Spanish but sounds far more poisonous than that when hissed in her Honduran accent. In the winter of 1982, after a former landlord simply abandoned the buildings without heat, Lopez brought the buildings’ families together, and they governed themselves — collecting money to pay the bills and replace the boiler, and forming teams to clean the hallways, put the trash out and make repairs.

Read the article in its entirety, it’s so good. These ladies know what’s up.

suzy-x:

Brooklyn women make their building theirs

The rent strike started two years ago when Sara Lopez woke up early one morning. No one sleeps much in these three buildings — in the winter there’s no heat, in the summer there’s no electricity, and all year there are rats and cockroaches scurrying in the walls — but that morning Lopez had slept even worse than usual, and she was mad.

“I thought and thought and decided that I needed to do something,” she said. “So I knocked on 51 doors because I got mad of so much injustice.”

At each door she and Trelles spread a clear message: Stop paying rent. It wasn’t an idea born out of an ideology regarding private property or capitalism or self-governance. Instead, Lopez — a retired public employee who says she still has faith in the power and intentions of the local government — was espousing a radicalism born from necessity and experience. She knew that tenants could run the buildings better than Petito, whom she called un payaso, which means “clown” in Spanish but sounds far more poisonous than that when hissed in her Honduran accent. In the winter of 1982, after a former landlord simply abandoned the buildings without heat, Lopez brought the buildings’ families together, and they governed themselves — collecting money to pay the bills and replace the boiler, and forming teams to clean the hallways, put the trash out and make repairs.

Read the article in its entirety, it’s so good. These ladies know what’s up.

(via sarah-laughs)

"fruits and vegetables are the most accessible foods around" typed the high school girl as her parents brought home groceries from Whole Foods.

kyssthis16:

cgdageek:

wretchedoftheearth:

johngaltinabikini:

opheliaofshalott:

johngaltinabikini:

wretchedoftheearth:

opheliaofshalott:

the 99 cent store sells fruits and vegge tho

I don’t know where you are, but that’s not commonplace.

Hell, I’ve been going to a walmart in a poor area lately that barely has fruit or vegetables.

there are no 99 cent stores where I live. . Also in the poor area my mom lives in the dollar tree doesn’t sell fruits and veggies.

I live in Los Angeles.

Have been on welfare my entire life.

Albertsons gives away its fruit and vegge when it’s not considered picture perfect.

There’s a way around everything if you want there to be.

BOOTSTRAPS

“IF I CAN DO IT EVERYONE CAN!”

yeah lolno.

Just because I did this last week, this is what I’d be paying the cheapest grocery store that I had access to until I got a boyfriend with a car:

Bananas - 32 cents each/80 cents a pound x 5 ($1.60)

White grapefruit - $2.39 each x 5 ($11.95)

V8 Juice - $6.49 for 6 11.5 oz cans

Snack

Raspberries - $8.79/12 oz x 2 ($17.58)

Blueberries - $8.79/12 oz x 2 ($17.58)

Baby carrots - $2.59/lb

Oranges - $1.49/each x 5 ($7.45)

Lunch

Watermelon - $7.99

Cantaloupe - $7.99

Grapes at $5.98/lb, probably about $12

Lettuce - $2.89 a head (x 2) - $5.78

Cucumber - $1.09 each (x 5) - $5.45

Sugar snap peas - $4.99/lb (x 2) - $9.98

Dinner

Broccoli Florets (frozen) - 14 oz - $3.09

Frenched Green Beans - 16 oz - $2.30

Baby red potatoes - $0.42 each x 10

I am an LA native.

I know for a FACT that NOT ALL Albertson’s give away their fruits and veggies.  

In fact, doing so could be a violation of the local health code. 

A store in LA County may be allowed to give away old fruits and veggies.

A store in an unincorporated area MAY NOT.

Not to mention, Albertson’s is a DYING grocery store chain in Southern Cali.

Ralph’s and Vons/Pavillions are in greater supply.

And they don’t give away shit.

Trust, I volunteered with the LA Food Bank for a year.

We BEGGED every grocery store on town for old food.

We got puffy cans, near rotten fruits/veggies, and about-to-mold bread from Albertson’s.

So sit down please before you hurt yourself.

(via hamburgerjack-deactivated201404)

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